Arts charity to help children affected by drink and drugs

Web aileen campbell cutting the ribbon at an exhibition launch at the gallery in 2013. photos courtesy of tom finnie

Scottish Government Minister for Children and Young People Aileen Campbell cut the ribbon at an exhibition launch at the gallery in 2013. Photo: Tom Finnie

Over 1000 east-end of Glasgow children who have been affected by drugs and alcohol abuse will release their creative side over the next three years

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9th February 2015 by Paul Cardwell 0 Comments

A Glasgow based charity has launched an art programme specifically to help children who live with a family member who has a drink or drug addiction in the city’s east end.

Those identified by Impact Arts will be invited to attend special therapeutic activities at the city’s Young Gallery.

It is hoped by going along the youngsters will learn ways to cope better in their home environment.

As many as 35% of children in the east end are living with someone who has a drink or drug addiction – some of the highest rates in Europe.

Rob Gallagher-Reilly, programme manager for Impact Arts, said: “Impact Arts has identified a strong need for a therapeutic programme which will address the negative effects of drug and alcohol misuse on children in the area.

Impact Arts has identified a strong need for a therapeutic programme which will address the negative effects of drug and alcohol misuse on children in the area

“We believe The Young Gallery: Art Therapy Programme will have a profound effect on individual, family and community resilience.”

Impact Arts has been funded to work with almost 1,000 children over a three-year period. Included in this is 114 places in specialist therapeutic arts activities in groups delivered with organisations such as Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy and 30 children will receive more intensive one-to-one art therapy.

The sessions, taking place with degree-qualified art therapists are aimed at increasing the children’s confidence and to help them realise their potential, which in turn makes them more resilient and able to develop better coping strategies.

Impact Arts is running an information session on the programme on 25 February at 2pm the Calton Heritage Centre.