Best of fronds: vote for the tree of the year

Tree web

​Public asked to vote for the best tree in Scotland

Graham Martin's photo

5th September 2014 by Graham Martin 0 Comments

A sweet chestnut planted in Cumbernauld by Mary Queen of Scots and Scotland's oldest tree are among the specimens facing a public vote to be named Scottish Tree of the Year.

The award is an annual search for the nation’s best loved tree and is organised by the Woodland Trust.

Six trees nominated by groups from around the country have been shortlisted in this year's competition.

Members of the public can vote for their favourite at www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/scottishtree until 26 October.

The winner will be revealed at a prize giving reception at the Scottish Parliament and it will go on to join trees from 10 other countries to compete in European Tree of the Year 2015.

Scotland’s grand old trees are as important as listed buildings or monuments but currently lack the same level of protection

Carol Evans, director of the Woodland Trust Scotland, said: “Tree of the Year is all about finding trees that are at the heart of local communities and that can bring people together.

“Scotland’s grand old trees are as important as listed buildings or monuments but currently lack the same level of protection. By sharing stories and encouraging people to value them we can raise awareness of the need to protect these trees, so that their stories can be passed on to future generations.”

Comedian and broadcaster Fred MacAulay is supporting the competition. He said: “It’s fantastic that players of People’s Postcode Lottery are lending their support to this unique celebration of Scotland’s best loved trees. All of the shortlisted entries have amazing stories to tell, and I’m sure it will be a close run vote.”

The shortlisted trees

1. Lady’s Tree, Loch of the Lowes, Perthshire, nominated by the Scottish Wildlife Trust 

2. the Kissing Beech, Kilvarock Estate, Inverness-shire, nominated by the Ancient Tree Inventory

3. The Fortingall Yew, Fortingall, Perthshire, nominated by Glen Lyon History Society

4. The Clachan Oak, Balfron, Stirlingshire, nominated by Balfron Community Council; 

5. Queen Mary’s Tree, Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire, nominated by Cumbernauld Community Council

6. The Gowk Tree, Moffat, Dumfries & Galloway, nominated by Moffat Wildlife Club.