Diabetes charity says more emotional support is needed

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Depression and stress are daily occurrences for diabetes patients but support is lacking 

23rd October 2015 by Robert Armour 4 Comments

More emotional support must be offered to people living with diabetes, a charity has warned.

Diabetes Scotland made the call as research shows people with the illness are twice as likely as the general population to suffer from depression but few get access to professional psychological support they need.

Access to support is one of the 15 “healthcare essentials” the charity says every person with diabetes should receive automatically on diagnosis.

Linda McGlynn, healthcare and patient engagement manager at Diabetes Scotland, said: “When you’re diagnosed with diabetes there is a huge focus on ensuring that you’re physically well and are receiving the health checks which will monitor your blood glucose levels, blood pressure and other physical indicators.  

Coping with the condition every hour of every day can be stressful and overwhelming

“However, getting to grips with your diagnosis can take its emotional toll and it’s important that people receive the right support to ensure they have good mental health and can cope with the pressures and challenges of living with a long-term, life-changing condition.

“People with diabetes tell us that coping with their condition every hour of every day can be stressful and overwhelming.

“It can feel very isolating as so few people understand what it’s all about. But we know that getting the right emotional support can make a huge difference in improving people’s mental health as well as helping improve their physical health outcomes.”

As well as increased rates of depression, levels of anxiety and eating disorders are also significantly higher among people with diabetes.

All of these conditions can lead to poorer diabetes self-care which can, in turn, lead to an increased risk of serious complications such as blindness, stroke, heart attack, kidney failure and amputation.

This means that giving more people access to appropriate emotional support could help the NHS save money by helping people to self-manage and reduce their risk of complications.

McGlynn added: “GPs should consider the emotional needs of people with diabetes as part of their overall personal care planning.

"They should ask people how they are feeling so they can pave the way to professional psychological support when they need it.

"But for this to happen it is important that appropriate psychological support services are commissioned and available to everyone who needs them, no matter where in Scotland they live."

Diabetes Scotland runs Careline Scotland which people can get in touch with if they have any questions related to diabetes. 

24th October 2015 by Sarah C.

I got diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes last year, and was put on Metformin. I followed the ADA diet 100% for a few weeks but it was ineffective at getting my blood sugar below 140. My Doctor was pretty ineffective as far as treatment options went (Metformin until Insulin...). Then I found the Big Diabetes Lie book - http://steamspoils.com/7-Steps-to-Health-and-The-Big-Diabetes-Lie-Review - created by Dr. Sidorov to help you figure out how to beat diabetes naturally, without being dependent on medications. Since following that protocol I've lost over 30 pounds and shaved 7 inches off my waist. I have more energy than ever, and can even work out twice on the same day when I feel like it. I hope that more people begin to open their eyes to the dead-end that is depending only on medications for Diabetes - there is a lot of success to be seen trying natural methods.

24th October 2015 by millerana

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24th October 2015 by Deborah

Emotional support is surely needed. I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2014. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally i began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn't right and began to do a lot of research. On April 13th I found this book on http://www.7stepstohealthreviews.com/ I read the book from end to end that night because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100, the next day was in the 90's and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70's and the 80's. My doctor took me off the metformin after just one week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds in a month. I now work out twice a day and still have tons of energy. I have lost 6+ inches around my waist and I am off my high blood pressure medication too. I have about 20 more pounds to go till my body finds its ideal weight. The great news is, this is a lifestyle I can live with, it makes sense and it works. God Bless the writer. I wish the ADA would stop enabling consumers and tell them the truth. You can get off the drugs, you can help yourself, but you have to have a correct lifestyle and diet. No more processed foods.

9th January 2017 by Nancy

At 38, I was diagnosed as Stage 2 Obese. Never in my life have I thought or even imagined that I would get that overweight. Aside from that bad news, my doctor told me I was on pre-diabetic stage and I need to start making drastic changes in my lifestyle. My husband and I went to Wallmart and we purchased a cookbook for diabetics. My sister also sent me these https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Supplement-Garcina-Cambogia-Capsules/dp/B00DFGBKGY to help with my weight loss. It's now a year since I received that terrible news and I'm glad to report that I lost the excess pounds and I'm doing really well. I do believe my family's emotional support was a great part of this success.