Music websites are excluding disabled people

Music microphone gig

​Disabled people say they are discouraged going to gigs because websites don't offer information on disabled access 

22nd February 2016 by Robert Armour 0 Comments

A shocking third of all music events have no information on their websites for disabled people, a survey has found.

The study of 386 UK gigs and festivals by the charity Attitude is Everything found that 60% of disabled people were put off buying tickets because they couldn't find details of things like wheelchair ramps and hearing loop stations.

Glastonbury Festival organiser Emily Eavis has now called on events to do more to ensure all music fans can enjoy music gigs as deaf and disabled people are now estimated to make up 15% of all live music attendees in the UK.

Attitude is Everything chief executive, Suzanne Bull, said: "Digital has revolutionised the live sector and how music lovers buy tickets, find information and share their experiences.

"A lack of decent online access information websites has become a constant source of frustration to millions of disabled fans."

A lack of decent online access information websites has become a constant source of frustration

Emily Eavis said it doesn’t take much to make sure disabled people have the information and access they need to enjoy concerts.

"It is vital that all festival-goers can easily access clear information about how to buy tickets, what facilities are available onsite and how they can arrange for the necessary support in order to be able to attend."

The law says people running gigs must make "reasonable adjustments" to make sure that everyone can enjoy the acts.

Geoff Ellis, who organises T in the Park, recently helped put on a gig for disabled music fans in Glasgow.

"It's been more difficult than I envisaged but it's been rewarding at the same time.

"I wouldn't say we treated them as an afterthought before but it's certainly enhanced our understanding of what the needs are for disabled customers."