Name change for Lottery funders

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The rebrand is intended to make a clearer link between playing the National Lottery and the good causes that benefit

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29th January 2019 by Graham Martin 0 Comments

Two major good cause funders have changed their names.

As previously revealed by TFN, Big Lottery Fund, the UK’s largest community funder - which distributes 40% of the good cause money raised by National Lottery players - will now be called The National Lottery Community Fund.  

In a related move, the Heritage Lottery Fund, which has invested almost £8 billion in UK heritage projects, will be known as The National Lottery Heritage Fund.

The rebrand is intended to make a clearer link between playing the National Lottery and the good causes that benefit. 

To aid this, both organisations have also unveiled refreshed brand identities that incorporate The National Lottery’s well know crossed-fingers.

Each year, the organisations invest hundreds of millions of pounds, raised through the sale of National Lottery tickets, in a range of community and heritage projects.

By aligning their brands more closely with The National Lottery, both organisations said they hope this will help players to better understand the difference they make when they buy a ticket.

The brand refresh of the two funds kicks-off The National Lottery’s 25th anniversary year. The first draw took place in November 1994 and since then, more than £30 million has been raised each week for a variety of good causes.

Dawn Austwick, chief executive of The National Lottery Community Fund, said: “National Lottery funding for good causes changes lives. As the largest community funder in the UK, we see the amazing achievements of thousands of people-led projects every year.

"From social groups for young carers to baking classes for the older generation, from craft workshops in rurally isolated areas to support sessions for new parents, communities are thriving thanks to The National Lottery.

“By deepening the connection between players and the great projects they are supporting, we can make sure more people understand the incredible difference they make across the UK.”

Ros Kerslake, The National Lottery Heritage Fund’s chief executive, added: “In 25 years The National Lottery has transformed the UK. Historic high streets and public parks have been revitalised; native wildlife has been protected; our museums and cultural attractions are now world-class; and stories and memories have been preserved. 

"But beyond the millionaires it’s created, many people simply aren’t aware of its impact on our daily lives. By putting The National Lottery brand front and centre of our own, we hope to help change that.”