Scots forced to foodbanks for soap and toothpaste

Trussell trust

Humiliation grows for for low-income families in Scotland hit by welfare cuts 

11th December 2017 by Robert Armour 1 Comment

Thousands of low-income Scots won’t be able to afford basic items like soap and toothpaste this Christmas says a shocking new report.

As the nation gets ready to indulge in a season known for excess, foodbank charity the Trussell Trust warned items seen as essential are in greater demand than ever before.   

In its first survey into the non-food items distributed by foodbanks in Scotland the charity found that 90% of its foodbanks were now giving out nappies, feminine hygiene products, soap and shower gel as well as toothpaste on top of emergency food aid.

Between April 2016 and March 2017, the trust’s network in Scotland provided more than 145,000 three day emergency food supplies to people in crisis – 48,000 of which went to children. 

Laura Ferguson, Trussell Trust’s area manager for Scotland, called the situation “shameful".

She added: “People must suffer the indignity of not having enough money to afford the absolute basics. Not just food, but soap, toothpaste and even feminine hygiene products.

“We know that the majority of people referred to foodbanks in our network are supported by working-age benefits, and time and again our data shows the main reasons people are referred to us are problems, cuts and changes to these benefits.

“Our generous donors and the volunteers and staff in foodbanks will strive to be there for people who would otherwise face going hungry. But we feel strongly that it should not be left to any charity to pick up the pieces of a welfare safety net that is failing to maintain basic living standards for all who need it.”

East Lothian Foodbank highlighted the problem.

“Once we had a referral for delivery to a family with four children, three with ages between 11 and 15. 

It should not be left to any charity to pick up the pieces of a welfare safety - Laura Ferguson

“Sanitary products were requested and we asked how many of the children were girls – the reply was all of them… that’s a fair cost, three girls and mum all requiring hygiene products could be in the region of £15-£20 per month, every month and if on low income budget can be quite restrictive.”

Stocks of emergency food, feminine hygiene products and other non-food items all vary between foodbanks, with a project’s ability to supplement nutritionally-balanced emergency food parcels with feminine hygiene products and other toiletries dependent on their local donations, said the trust. 

11th December 2017 by Joseph Turner

It is indeed such a shame that so many people in Scotland must suffer the indignity of not having enough money to even afford the absolute basics. Not just food, but also soap, toothpaste and even feminine hygiene products. http://www.franklinplannerme.com