Scots town wants to be first to declare itself plastic-free

Cropplastic pollution

It is aiming to be the first town in Scotland to achieve plastic-free status under a scheme run by the charity Surfers Against Sewage

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3rd December 2018 by Graham Martin 0 Comments

A Scots town is aiming to be the first in the country to be declared plastic-free.

Activists in Dunfermline have launched a new group to seek to significantly reduce the amount of plastic used, particularly single use plastics.

If it is successful it will be able to call itself Scotland’s first plastics-free town. 

Plastic-Free Dunfermline began life as a Facebook page nine months ago created for individuals and families to share ideas to reduce single-use plastic - today the page has over 1300 followers.

It became an unincorporated community group this week, and the group’s aims are to raise awareness about single use plastic pollution and its impact on human health and environment, as well as to promote action about reducing, reusing and repairing single use plastic, and sharing resources.

It is aiming to be the first town in Scotland to achieve plastic-free status under a scheme run by the charity Surfers Against Sewage.

Currently there are 31 communities in Scotland vying for the label – where significant action is taken to reduce use of single-use plastics.

Founder James Daw said: “I am delighted that we have enough support to justify forming a community group. Together we will work hard to make Dunfermline one of the first towns in Scotland to be awarded plastic-free status.

“We hope to harness the energy, enthusiasm and commitment of local people who care about the environment, to help us engage with local schools, businesses, community groups, Fife Council and members of the public to eliminate unnecessary single use plastic.”

Plastics can stay in landfill and where ever it has been dumped for 400 or 500 years, releasing toxins from the plastics into the ground and ultimately into the food chain.

A recent study found that out of 11 groups tested in various parts of the world every single person had plastic in their body from eating normal food, particularly from the oceans and the seas.