Anti-smoking charter proves popular

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The charter was launched at the Scottish Parliament by veteran sports commentator Archie McPherson

It's hoped that by 2034 a generation of Scots will be smoke free.

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11th May 2016 by Paul Cardwell 0 Comments

Over 50 organisations have signed-up to a charter that aims to create a generation of smoke free Scots by 2034.

Led by health charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Scotland, the charter asks organisations to do something to reduce tobacco use throughout the country.

Organisations and charities including Children 1st,  Young Scot and Children in Scotland have all signed up to the charter which was launched one year ago.

Pledges have included making grounds and premises smoke-free, encouraging staff to quit smoking and advocating the benefits of smoke-free homes to parents and carers.

This is helping to ensure that the children who are in nursery now are the first generation to grow up in a tobacco-free Scotland.

Sheila Duffy, chief executive of ASH Scotland, said: “In its first year the charter has gained momentum and is proving an effective way to align organisations in the fight against tobacco and the harmful effects it has on children and young people.

“The charter community are sharing their experience of supporting the charter and bringing more and more on board. This is helping to ensure that the children who are in nursery now are the first generation to grow up in a tobacco-free Scotland.

“We’re encouraging organisations from across sectors to get behind this important initiative.”

Currently, everyday 36 young people become new smokers in Scotland.

Evidence shows that the younger a person starts to smoke, the more likely they are to continue smoking into adulthood, the more heavily they are likely to smoke as an adult and the more likely they are to fall ill and die early as a result of smoking.

Jackie Brock, chief executive of Children in Scotland, said: “We recognise the importance of good health and wellbeing and actively work in partnership with organisations, young people, families, professionals and policy-makers to ensure that the current inequalities in health and wellbeing are reduced for our next generation.

“With this in mind, we fully endorse all the principles within Scotland's Charter for a Tobacco-free Generation and are very keen to support ASH Scotland in its implementation.”