Youngsters to lead mental health study

Youngpersonmentalhealthweb

The project will examine child and adolescent mental health services in Scotland

6th December 2017 by Gareth Jones 2 Comments

Scottish youngsters are set to lead an in-depth study into mental health.

The Scottish Government has revealed that a group of Scots from a variety of backgrounds will be selected as part of a new youth commission on mental health services.

A fund of £95,000 has been committed to establishing the group, which will feature up to 20 people aged between 14 and 22.

The project will last for 15 months and will see a study into child and adolescent mental health services carried out.

Mental health minister Maureen Watt said: "The youth commission is an opportunity for us to better understand the current picture of support for children and adolescents across Scotland.

"These young people will do their own research, identify issues that are important to them and speak to experts, policymakers and service providers to look at areas for improvement."

Half of all mental health problems in adults start when people are in their mid-teens and three-quarters by mid-20s, according to the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH).

SAMH chief executive Billy Watson, said: "It's crucial we place young people at the heart of finding solutions to improve services now and for generations to come.

"We look forward to working with young people and our partners, and trust this work and its recommendations will lead to a step change in the provision of mental health services for children and young people across Scotland."

Louise Macdonald, chief executive of Young Scot, said: "Support to develop positive mental health is a key issue for young people and is raised in nearly all of Young Scot's work with young people across Scotland."

Comments

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7th December 2017 by louise cameron

I think this should include primary school age children to be included in research and finding solutions. This would prevent many young teenagers suffering in silence. Teach children it's OK not to feel ok and educate how to deal with their feeling and thoughts well in advance of feeling so low and alone in society.

13th December 2017 by Laura

I would be interested to know how young people will be selected and/or how they can get involved if they are motivated to change mental health services for the better.