Funding to help young people affected by substance abuse

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Charities through Scotland win out in Lloyds TSB Foundation for Scotland new funding

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5th May 2014 by Paul Cardwell 0 Comments

Charities throughout Scotland will enjoy a share of nearly three quarters of a million pounds in new funding announced by the Lloyds TSB Foundation for Scotland.

The foundation has revealed that 37 third sector organisations will receive a share of £736,535.

All the money we award is matched by the charities with funds from other sources, so the total work funded as a result of these awards will be £1.2 million

From the awards, six charities will share almost £600,000 in funding made from the foundation’s Partnership Drugs Initiative programme, which will be used to help children and young people affected by substance abuse, either their own or their parents.

The biggest award of £164,379 was made to Children 1st for it to continue to support the running costs of the Edinburgh Befriending Consortium for those aged 5-16 who struggle because of their parents alcohol and drug issues.

Mary Craig, chief executive of Lloyds TSB Foundation for Scotland said: “The Partnership Drugs Initiative programme is a partnership with the Scottish Government and all the money we award is matched by the charities with funds from other sources, so the total work funded as a result of these awards will be £1.2 million.”

The remainder of the cash is to be given out through the foundation’s Henry Duncan Awards.

The 31 small grants, ranging from £1,600 to £6,500, will support grassroots charities to cover basic operating costs such as salaries, rent and energy bills.

The Henry Duncan awards were established in 2010 to mark the 200th anniversary of the establishment of the first ever savings bank by Rev Henry Duncan, which led to the formation of the foundation.

“Without having funding in place for these it is impossible for them to get on with delivering the services that make such a positive difference to the people they support,” Craig added.