Personalised JustGiving pages “raise three times more”

Justgiving

Researchers uncover secrets to successful fundraising on the online platform. 

3rd December 2019 by Gavin Stuart 0 Comments

Fundraisers who personalise their JustGiving statement raise three times as much as those who use the default statement, according to new research.

Consultancy firm Insight-ful analysed 200,000 statements on the website for its study in a bid to discover what drives online donations.

The report revealed that personalised statements raise 3.4 times as much as default statements, while appeals conducted as part of a company tended to raise more money than individual fundraisers.

Supporters of religious and disability charities raised on average the highest totals online whilst supporters of cancer research and animal charities raise on average the lowest.

Raising money in lieu of gifts at weddings and in memory have the highest average income totals whilst giving in celebration and individual appeals raise the least.

The report also found that 70% of all money raised on JustGiving is raised by just 20% of fundraisers.

Insight-ful also analysed word used on JustGiving statements to see which ones were associated with the most and least successful appeals.

People who used words such as plz, selfie, Xbox, mixed martial Arts and glitter in their JustGiving personal statements were found to raise the least money for charities, whereas people who used the words workmates, solicitors, CEO, mission, improves and immeasurable raised up to 13 times more.

However, Insight-ful admits this is likely because of the different demographics – and their spending power - targeted by appeals.

Jonathan Cook, Insight-ful director, said: “Online giving websites allow us such a rich source of information, but charities only really look at the financial data available: income, number of participants, number of donations, Gift Aid, etc.

“On each and every online giving page though, the fundraiser outlines the exact reason why they are taking part in the event itself. We have developed an analysis tool that allowed us to study the 47million words found in 200,000 JustGiving statements to really understand the motivations of fundraisers from all charities.

“By understanding why people take part in events, this analysis will allow charities to market their events to the right people in the right way.

“For example; discovering people take part in your walks because they are doing it in memory of someone they have lost will have immediate impact in how your charity can talk to its supporters about taking part in a sponsored walk.”